Trooper Robert Renaker Miller | Kentucky State Police

Trooper Robert Renaker Miller
Trooper Robert Renaker Miller

Badge 141
Age: 23
Served: 2 years, 11 months
March 16, 1948 to February 14, 1951

Robert was born on March 4, 1927 in Boone County to Woodford Robert and Eva Gertrude (Renaker) Miller. The family lived in a rented house on Dixie Highway in Florence. Woodford Miller worked odd jobs as a laborer to help pay the family’s rent of $18 per month. By 1940, he was a guard with an armored car service and Mrs. Miller was employed as a cashier in a bank. Robert attended St. Paul’s School on Dixie Highway.

Robert enlisted in the United States Navy and served in World War II. He was honorably discharged as a Sailor 1st Class. After returning home, he joined the Kentucky State Police in 1948 and by 1951 was assigned to Post 6 in Dry Ridge.

On February 14, 1951, Trooper Miller was asked to check road conditions in the Boone County area. While checking U.S. 25 (Dixie Highway) about 3 miles south of Florence, he lost control of his cruiser, skidded across the centerline and into the path of a Union Light, Heat, and Power Company truck. In the resulting head-on crash, Trooper Miller suffered a fractured skull and died. He was the 2nd Kentucky State Police Trooper to die in the line of duty.

Trooper Miller was survived by his parents. He was buried on February 17, 1951 in Forest Lawn Cemetery in Erlanger.

On June 30, 2010, in keeping with the traditions of the KSP, a section of roadway in Boone County was dedicated to Trooper Miller. Two other Kentucky troopers, who also died in the line of duty, were similarly honored. Memorial wreaths were simultaneously placed on their graves by Troopers at 1 p.m.

If you have information, artifacts, archives, or images regarding officer or incident, please contact the Greater Cincinnati Police Museum at Director@police-museum.org.

 

This narrative was revised February 21, 2015 by Cincinnati Police Lieutenant Stephen R. Kramer (Retired), Greater Cincinnati Police Historical Society President, with assistance from Kentucky State Trooper Richard P. Saint-Blancard and Cincinnati Police Sergeant Thomas Waller (Retired), Greater Cincinnati Police Historical Society Past Vice President, and Cincinnati Homicide Detective Edward W. Zieverink III (Retired), Greater Cincinnati Police Museum Historian. All rights are reserved to them and the Greater Cincinnati Police Historical Society.