Cincinnati Police Department History – 1875 to 1899

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The Greater Cincinnati Police Museum

“Preserving the History of Law Enforcement in the Greater Cincinnati Area”

 


 

Cincinnati Police Department History – 1875 to 1899
1875
Snelbaker, Thomas E.
Superintendent replaced the police chief and appointed by mayor. Snelbaker had been secretary of the water works, 1 year, 3 months
1
1875
 –
City composed of 24 square miles and patrolled by 89 day and 183 night officers
5
1875
Police Districts increased to ten
5
1876
March
Covington, S.F.; Jacob, Charles, Jr.; Ziegler, George; Brown, Charles; Enoch, Carson
Police Board reestablished by the legislature; members appointed by governor; City disputes and loses in Ohio Supreme Court
1876
Police Relief Association organized; elected by the force; distributed pecuniary relief to sick or disabled members and paid insurance benefits to friends of the deceased.
1877
Johnson, Capt. Jacob (Jake)
Superintendent, appointed, had been a policeman for a good while
1
1877
Wood, Ira
Chief (17th); had been superintendent of the work house, died early in 1878
3, 4
1877
Six changes in the board of police commissioners in a single year.
1878
12-Sep
Armstrong, Edward C., Planner
Telephone introduced, two years after Alexander Graham Bell obtained his patent, contracted with Cincinnati Suburban Telegraph and Telephone, first police agency to do so
1878
Ziegler, George W.
Superintendent (5th); was a member of the Police Board and had been and continued to be a butcher. Later he held positions of sheriff and superintendent of the work house and kept his butcher market throughout; 2 years
1
1879
Telephone exchange replace dial system telegraph; call boxes and station on same system, serving entire department; first in US to do so
1879
Complement included Superintendent of Police, Inspector, clerk, 20 lieutenants, 20 station keepers, 300 patrolmen, court officers, sanitary force, and other employees.
5
1879
Expenditures to Pettibone Manufacturing Company included belts, etc. J.J. Tower Company supplied whistles. J.J. Sayer Company supplied badges.
5
1879
Inventory: 8 awnings, 53 belts for revolvers, 249 belts and tassels, 350 badges, 10 gongs (alarm), 3 pairs of handcuffs, 11 lanterns, 4 medicine cases, 330 whistles, 250 wreaths, Gatling gun, carriage and equipments, 9550 metallic cartridges, 10 Navy revolvers, 75 bullet molds, 54 cap boxes, and 1000 rounds of pistol cartridges.
5
1879
Jacob, Charles, Jr.
Superintendent, appointed
4
1880
27-Feb
Wilson, Captain, Drill Instructor
Drill introduced to police under administration of Mayor Bishop, stating, “almost indispensable in dispersing a crowd or quelling riot.”
1880
Population – County – 313,374
1880
Wappenstein, Charles
Superintendent (6th); 2 months
1880
Carson, Enoch T.
Superintendent for (7th); had been President of the Knight Templar and Masonic Mutual Aid Associations; 1 year, 7 months
1
1881
5-Dec
Armstrong, Edward C., Superintendent of Police Telegraph
Patrol Wagons: purchased by Armstrong (City Council reimbursed him in 1883); provide assistance for men on the beats, carry reinforcements, transport prisoners, sick, and wounded, and aid fireman; 2nd in US
1881
Board of Police Commissioners were again abolished, the mayor taking over the management of the force
3
1881
Gessert, Jacob
Chief; 1 month, appointed, resigned; committed suicide
1881
Reilley, Col. M. F.
Chief; had been a sergeant in the U.S. Army. Patrolman in 1873, standing at 5th and Vine. Promoted to lieutenant, then captain. After resigning as chief, he became the head of the Merchant’s Police Systems; 3 years, 2 months
1
1882
Arrests: 13,042: 8559 for offenses, 4046 safekeeping, 48 Lunacy, 750 Suspicion,
1882
18-Jul
District 6 became uninhabitable and removal was made to temporary premises on Eastern Avenue, in turn which are “entirely unfit for the purpose.”
1882
Complement – 346
1883
Arrests: 12,544: 7713 for offenses, 4450 safekeeping, 41 Lunacy, 340 Suspicion
1883
11-Feb
Hilton, Ptln. Joseph
While working in the flooded areas of Cincinnati, Patrolman Hilton’s only child died at their flooded home in Covington, KY.
1
1883
15-Feb
Macke, Spec Officer Ben
During the floods, Officer Macke, his wife, and his child were on the second floor of their house when was beginning to flood in the basement. Another person struck a match in the basement and and explosion destroyed the home and killed all those in it.
1
1883
Feb.
1883 & 1884 Floods — No American city of its size had ever suffered from inundations as had Cincinnati in 1883, then again in February 1884. The encroachment included one-third of the city. Officers were subjected to frightful changes of temperature that marked both floods, and repeatedly drenched to the skin while performing their mission of duty and mercy. Officers kept vigilant watch, by boat, against crime and accident. Police stations were repeatedly filled with poor families rescued from their homes. The mayor ordered out the First Regiment, 400 strong, to aid police to patrol the stricken areas.
1
1883
Complement – 325, 1 superintendent, 1 inspector, 1 surgeon, 20 lieutenants, 15 sergeants, 4 clerks, 5 court officers, 9 detailed patrolmen, 90 day patrolmen, 159 night patrolmen, 20 station-house keepers, 26 vacancies
1883
Patrol Wagons: complement increased to 5 for $20,000; manned by 3 or 4 men with stretchers, tourniquets, and other surgical instruments
1883
Devine, W.H., Jr., Chief Operator
Call boxes: 100 in place. A contract with city and Suburban Telegraph Company was extended for service of the system.
1883
District stations ( 7 of 10 are City property) suffering from several years of neglect including roofs and sanitary problems
1883
District 4, 3rd and Mill Streets, considerably damaged by flood of 1883.
1883
District 10, occupy rented quarters in Cumminsville, which are “inadequate, expensive, and ought be vacated at once if for not other than sanitary reasons.”
1883
District 9 (21st Ward) is an old leasehold, inherited from the annexation of Storrs Township, and has an annual ground rent of only $75.00, but in a poor location.
1883
Central Station, located in City Hall, is “the worst appointed and most unfit for a prison.” (The jail was moved from City Hall to Hamilton County Justice Center almost a century later).
1883
Budget: Cost of maintenance was $286,296.93, a $117,742.32 deficit.
1883
Police Relief Fund death allowance was $300 insuring “at least a respectable burial. $2100 was paid to the families of seven members deceased and $4587.50 disbursed as sick relief.
1883
District locations: 1st in City Buildings on 9th Street, 2nd on Hammond Street, 3rd on Bremen Street, 4th on Third Street (Stone Estate), 5th at Oliver and Linn Streets, 6th on Fulton (abandoned), 7th in Walnut Hills, 8th in Corryville, 9th on Lower River
1883
Patrol House locations: No. 1 on Eighth near Plum (owned by J.C. Wagner), No. 2 at 8 McAllister Street (owned by J.W. Wilshire), No. 3 at 648 Race Street (owned by I.P. Strauss & Bro.), No. 4 at 545 West Sixth Street (owned by E.H.Walton), No. 5 at Olive
1883
National Extract of Officers: 171 born in US (3 colored), 84 in Ireland, 58 in Germany, 3 in England, 5 in Scotland, 1 in Nova Scotia, 1 in Italy, 1 in Wales.
1883
Salaries: Superintendent $2500, Inspector $1500, Chief Clerk $1500, Assistant Clerk $1000, Lieutenant $900, Detectives $900, Station-Keepers $600, Patrolmen, Court Officers, and other employees $800
1883
Inventory included: Awnings, belts, tassels, bibles, bath tubs, blackboards, headstands, coal, cups, cans, coal oil cans, dusters, fire keys, gongs, hatchets, hose, hand-cuffs, lanterns, ladders, looking-classes, lounges, maces, safes, shovels, slates, s
1883
Ordnance included: Gatling gun, 2,680 metallic cartridges, 84 Navy revolvers and belts, 75 bullet molds, 54 cap boxes, and 18 muskets.
1883
Felony Arrests: 166 Assault to Kill, 5 Assault to Rob, 14 Attempt Rape, 1 Abducting Child, 1 Bigamy, 7 cutting to wound, 147 Carrying Concealed Weapons, 4 Manslaughter, 23 Murder, 3 Rape, 50 Robbery, 61 Burglary, 649 Petit Larceny, 86 Grand Larceny, 10 F
1883
National Extract of Arrests: 8460 born in US (1012 colored), 1910 Ireland, 1808 Germany, 129 England, 33 France, 21 Russia, 47 Scotland, 4 Spain, 49 Canada, 14 Wales, 18 Poland, 3 Austria, 38 Italy, 5 Holland, 3 China, 3 Jamaica
1883
Misdemeanor Arrests: 973 Assault, 175 Abusing Family,8 Cruelty to Children, 1302 Disorderly Conduct, 1682 Drunk, 1 Exposing Person, 2 Bastardy, 19 Committing Nuisance, 42 Discharging Firearms, 1 Incest,17 House of Ill Fame, 27 Personal Violence of Office
1883
Calls for Service – 2389
1883
Injuries to and Illnesses of Officers: 3 Abscesses, 58 slight ailments, 1 asthma, 5 Bronchitis, 13 diarrhea, 3 Dysentery, 2 fractures, 5 gunshot wounds, 2 Remittent fever, 7 Rheumatism, 1 typhoid Fever, 2 Pleuro-pneumonia, 2 Pleurisy, 9 tonsillitis, 1 Pr
1884
28-Mar
Court House Riots — On December, 24, 1883, William Berner, an 18-year-old German, and Joseph Palmer, a 19-year-old mulatto, beat with hammers and strangled their employer, William Kirk, and dumped his body on the outskirts of the city in some brush along the Mill Creek. A jury found them guilty of Murder in the 2nd Degree and he was sentenced to 20 years. Many were incensed that the death penalty was not levied and after a meeting in Music Hall on Elm Street, they stormed the jail at Court and Sycamore Streets. During a three-day siege, the militia was called in. During one of their volleys of shots, Patrol Wagon Driver Joe Sturm was struck by 5 balls and killed. Berner was never found because he had been removed before the crowd arrived on the first night.
1, 5
1884
Arrests: 12,543: 7561 for offenses, 4624 safekeeping, 113 Lunacy, 476 Suspicion
1884
Complement – 353
1885
Arrests: 12,274: 7961 for offenses, 4235 safekeeping, 78 Lunacy, 517 Suspicion
1885
Board of Police Commissioners was again created, appointed by board of public works. This time they received compensation for their duties, $1500 per annum.
1
1885
Complement – 347
1885
Hudson, Col. Edwin
Superintendent; 1 year
3
1885
Wappenstein, Charles
Chief of detectives, succeeded by Grannon, Capt.
4
1885
Dunn, James
Inspector, succeeded by Weaver, LT Thomas, then Mullen, Michael
4
1886
Mar
Legislature created a non-partisan police force, increasing the force from 300 to 400 men.
1, 3
1886
30-Mar
Morgan, Robert J. (President); Topp, George R.; Dodds, Milo G.; Minor, Dr. Thomas C.
Civil Service Commission established in Cincinnati (1883 in the Federal government). All police affairs rest with the mayor and 4 police commissioners, not more than two of whom should belong to the same party and appointed by the governor. Insured once a policeman was appointed, he would not be discharged unless he behaved in conduct prejudicial to the police department
4
1886
6-Apr
Armstrong, C.L., MD
Police Surgeon appointed; Walter A. Dun, MD, and A.B. Isham, M.D., assistants
1886
Arrests: 12,903; 8466 for offenses, 3578 safekeeping, 43 Lunacy, 871 Suspicion, 26 fugitives, 38 held for other authorities
1886
Board of Examiners to conduct regular “mental and manual” examinations and to assure rigid physical requirements
1
1886
Board of Police Commissioners dismissed
1886
Complement – 344
1886
Rittweger, Philip, Chief of Detectives
Detective Bureau made a distinct department
3
1886
Military drill under a drillmaster
1886
McDonough, Thomas
Mounted policemen on horseback begin replacing foot patrolmen on outlying beats; first in Walnut Hills, 2 p.m. to 11 p.m.
1886
Brendamour, A. C.
Police Gymnasium established and first instructor; including physical training
1886
Police Library opened in basement of City Hall
1886
Police Relief Fund taken over by the Board of Commissioners and $.50 deducted from pay each month.
1886
Recruiting: Patrolman and substitutes 21 to 40 years w/ exceptions. Lieutenants 21 to 50. Min. ht. 5”7″, min wt by ht., min. chest measurement by ht. graded by power, speed, and endurance tested on a track
1886
Roll of Honor awarded for meritorious deeds, who have distinguished themselves by brave deeds, and a place on this list is much coveted.
1886
Moore, Col. Arthur G.
Superintendent (11th); 2 months; left to become the superintendent of the water works
1
1886
Deitsch, Col. Philip H
Superintendent (12th); 16 years, 7 months to 1903, died in office
3
1886
Uniforms: Dark blue overcoats, double breasted, short rolling plain collars, buttoned close to the neck; waste 2.5 inches below the natural waste; skirt, 4 inches below the knee-pan; pockets right breast outside, left breast inside, skirt both sides;
1886
Uniforms: Dark blue, single breasted vests, made without collars with seven police buttons to bottom up to within three inches of the neck.
1886
Uniforms: In pockets: Manual, fire card, and memorandum book.
1886
Uniforms: Lieutenants, sergeants, and patrolmen dark blue pantaloons with a white welt in the outer seam.
1886
Uniforms: Mounted police and patrol-wagon men like the U.S. cavalry jacket, single breasted, 9 small regulation buttons on breast. Mounted have cape.
1886
Uniforms: Patrolmen blue cloth helmet, having in front a white metallic wreath, encircling silver figures indicating the officer’s number. Covers may be worn over the helmets in stormy weather.
1886
Uniforms: Row of eight police buttons on each side, four buttons behind with the side edge, and three small police buttons on each cuff, except the Superintendent and Inspector may wear velvet collars and extra buttons on the cuffs.
1886
Uniforms: Self cocking pistol hip pocket, hanging from belt: rosewood baton w/ red cord & tassel , cartridge-box on belt with six fixed charges, and fire, patrol-box, and release keys. Badge on left breast from which chain to whistle.
1886
Uniforms: Sergeants and patrolmen dark blue, single-breasted, straight frock coats, buttoned to the throat, plain jacket collar, straight skirt, 9 police buttons on breast, two on each cuff and four behind; 2 inside breast pockets, cash pocket on right.
1886
Uniforms: Sergeants blue cloth helmet with gold bullion wreath in front encircling gold bullion letters indicating their rank.
1886
Uniforms: Station house keeper same as patrolmen
1886
Uniforms: Summer, blue flannel sack coat and pantaloons
1886
Uniforms: Superintendent, inspector, and lieutenants dark blue double-breasted frock coat, plain collar, six police buttons on each side, buttoned to the neck; skirt 1 inch above the center of knee-pan; pockets inside each breast and each side of skirt;
1886
Uniforms: Superintendent, inspector, and lieutenants on each shoulder gold bullion strap indicating their rank.
1886
Uniforms: Superintendent, inspector, and lieutenants shall wear a blue cloth cap, with a gold bullion wreath in front, encircling gold bullion letters indicating the rank of the officer.
1886
Uniforms: White gloves in the summer when on special duty, and dark gloves in he winter
1886
Crawford, Ralph A.
Chief of Detectives succeeding Rittweger
4
1887
Annual Parade established; show fitness and discipline of the department
1887
1-Jul
Manual of Rules and Regulations established and issued
1887
Arrests: 15,244; 463 felony, 10,479 misdemeanor, 3636 safekeeping, 95 Lunacy, 888 Suspicion, 35 fugitives from justice, 54 held for other authorities
1887
Complement – 432
1887
Topp, George R.; Dodds, Milo G.; Minor, Dr. Thomas C.; Boyle, James
Civil Service Commission
4
1887
Dodds, Milo G.; Minor, Dr. Thomas C.; Boyle, James; Werner, Louis
Civil Service Commission
4
1887
Hazen, COL Lawrence
Chief of Detectives
4
1888
Arrests: 16,221; 533 felony, 12,245 misdemeanor, 2935 safekeeping, 108 Lunacy, 718 Suspicion, 66 fugitives from justice, 64 held for other authorities
1888
Calls For Service: Patrol Wagon calls, 10,605; General Messages 372,445; Officers on beats, 130,305; Total, 513,355
1888
Complement – 465
1888
School of Instruction established; formal training for all members in the station, presented from the Manual by the district lieutenant
1888
Telephone operating room divided into two reliefs; each 12 hours daily; operators include Harry N. Adams, Joseph Sullivan, Harry White, and Frank Nugent
1889
Arrests: 15,965; 516 felony, 11,659 misdemeanor, 2818 safekeeping, 87 Lunacy, 535 Suspicion, 18 fugitives from justice, 62 held for other authorities
1889
Complement – 472
1889
Statute enacted closing saloons on Sundays. It was very unpopular among the saloon owners and patrons, but the mayor felt compelled to enforce it. During the next seven Sundays, 1950 arrests were made. The first to be prosecuted was convicted, sentenced to the work house, and released on an appeal that afternoon. After twelve more trials, all jury trials, some were convicted, some were not. The prosecutor decided to save the community the expense of more prosecutions and soon thereafter the mayor suspended the arrests.
1
1890
Arrests: 16,994; 576 felony, 13,184 misdemeanor, 2709 safekeeping, 87 Lunacy, 247 Suspicion, 23 fugitives from justice, 128 held for other authorities
1890
Complement – 471
1890
Population – City – 296,908
1890
Population – County – 374,573
1890
1891
Arrests: 16,217; 508 felony, 13,021 misdemeanor, 2027 safekeeping, 70 Lunacy, 398 Suspicion, 33 fugitives from justice, 160 held for other authorities
1891
Complement – 477
1892
Arrests: 18,229; 582 felony, 14,958 misdemeanor, 1939 safekeeping, 56 Lunacy, 470 Suspicion, 23 fugitives from justice, 202 held for other authorities
1892
Bertillon Department established for the system of measurement of the human body.
1892
Complement – 482
1893
Arrests: 18,633; 513 felony, 15,570 misdemeanor, 1757 safekeeping, 55 Lunacy, 331 Suspicion, 14 fugitives from justice, 209 held for other authorities
1893
Complement – 483 – 1 superintendent, 1 inspector, 2 surgeons, 22 lieutenants, 32 sergeants, 431 patrolmen, and 44 station house keepers, mounted patrolmen, patrol wagon men, court officers, etc. Patrol 24 Sq. Mi.
1893
Headquarters moved into City Hall, west wing.
1894
Arrests: 17,937; 518 felony, 14,766 misdemeanor, 1949 safekeeping, 53 Lunacy, 394 Suspicion, 19 fugitives from justice, 238 held for other authorities
1894
Complement – 483
1895
Arrests: 14,205; 491 felony, 13,108 misdemeanor, 1937 safekeeping, 70 Lunacy, 271 Suspicion, 29 fugitives from justice, 450 held for other authorities
1895
Complement – 493
1896
Complement – 495
1896
Arrests: 14,205; 504 felony, 10,974 misdemeanor, 1924 safekeeping, 51 Lunacy, 297 Suspicion, 27 fugitives from justice, 428 held for other authorities
1897
Complement – 531
1897
Arrests: 14,301; 532 felony, 10,789 misdemeanor, 2056 safekeeping, 62 Lunacy, 187 Suspicion, 13 fugitives from justice, 662 held for other authorities
1898
Arrests: 12,738; 484 felony, 9246 misdemeanor, 2319 safekeeping, 58 Lunacy, 379 Suspicion, 23 fugitives from justice, 199 held for other authorities
1898
Complement – 530
1899
Complement – 531
1899
Arrests: 12,860; 398 felony, 9442 misdemeanor, 2379 safekeeping, 71 Lunacy, 333 Suspicion, 12 fugitives from justice, 225 held for other authorities
1899
Bicycle Squad formed to patrol outlying districts

 

 

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